Grapeview Point Boat Works

81 E Grapeview Point Rd + Allyn, WA 98524 + 360-277-9015 + boat_works@yahoo.com

Building a Glued Lapstrake Tirrik

Page 10: Ready for Paint

Tirrik's completed hatches
Tirrik's completed hatches

We made and installed the brass turnbuttons that secure the hatches today, and also did a lot of epoxy clean-up, driving screws and more filling screw holes.

We also made a few teak cleats for the rudder control lines and the halyards. We like wood cleats, since they aren't as hard (literally!) on the boat or its occupants. And we can make them exactly the right size to suit their purpose and line size.

View of the interior with undercoat
View of the interior with undercoat

The Tirrik is now in a whole bunch of pieces, each getting sanded and puttied and ready for finishing. We won't get to see her together again for a couple weeks.

Tirrik's centerboard, coated with graphite epoxy
Tirrik's centerboard, coated with graphite epoxy

Five days later...

We have the second coat of primer sprayed on the interior tonight, which should be enough to sand to a smooth surface in preparation for finish coats. We also have a first coat on both sides of the floorboards and rudder trunk. The centerboard and rudder have two coats of graphite-fortified epoxy which provides a durable and slippery surface for these parts to move against.

Another view of the interior before enamel
Another view of the interior before enamel

The second coat of primer on the exterior isn't quite hard enough to sand, so we thought wed turn her over again to start prepping the exterior. Most of the primer will be sanded off, and it goes a lot faster if the paint is hard enough to not clog the sandpaper much. There are a lot of surfaces to be sanded in the interior, so anything we can do to help the process is well worthwhile.

Garboard drains
Garboard drains

The garboard drains are tapered softwood plugs in a tapered hole. We first saw these on plans for an 1880's rowing boat, and have been using them happily for years. Put them in hand-tight when dry, and they will swell very tight when they get wet. A lanyard keeps them from getting lost. The American Boat and Yacht Council, which sets safety standards for recreational craft, endorses this type of drain, but only for wooden boats.

Reinforcing the motorwell with Dynel. The ragged edge will be trimmed once the epoxy sets up a bit.
The ragged edge will be trimmed once the epoxy sets up a bit.

We decided to sheath the edge of the cutout for the outboard lower unit with Dynel and epoxy, since it will probably get banged up a bit when installing and removing the outboard. We also enlarged the cutout by 1/4" all around, to give a bit more clearance for the prop and cavitation plate.

We finish sanded the oars today, and applied the first coat of varnish. We should be able to get on a coat each day or so, if the weather holds. Six coats should do it.

The bottom is painted with marine enamel
The bottom is painted with marine enamel

Three days later...

We put coat four of varnish on the oars today, and coat three on the tiller, and mast. The exterior has the plank edges epoxy sealed, and one coat of primer, which we are sanding tonight, and should get coat two on tonight also.

Two weeks later..

Lots of progress on the Tirrik lately. We just painted the sheerstrake this afternoon, so the painting is finally completed (except for a bit of touch-up).

Most of what remains is stitching leathers on the oars and sprit, splicing the shrouds, and sorting out a whole bunch of details. We are getting her ready to take to the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival September 7-11. She is really looking sharp, and were sure she'll get plenty of attention at the PT show.




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