Caledonia Yawl – Chapter 11: Paint and varnish are complete. Let the rigging begin!

We’ve spent the last few weeks watching paint dry. Oh, and enjoying the holidays with our families.

Finally the paint was hard enough for us to reassemble all of the interior parts – centerboard cap, thwart, side benches and floorboards. These four photos show the interior components.

Interior looking aft

The completed Caledonia Yawl, looking aft

This photo is looking aft. The soft gray interior looks great with the gray blue thwart and benches and the bare cedar floorboards, which will turn gray in time. The water tight compartment to the left of the motor well will be useful to store gear you wish to keep dry.

Interior looking forward

The interior looking forward

Looking forward, we see the large storage compartment under the forward deck. Note the centerboard is graphite/epoxy coated for wear resistance and ease of maintenance. A garboard drain on each side of the centerboard will make it easy to wash out the interior periodically.

Floorboards

Interior of the Caledonia Yawl

The floorboards remove individually without tools.

Interior of Caledonia Yawl

Note the garboard drains on either side of the centerboard trunk

The mainsheet and block attach to the pad eye on the end of the centerboard cap.

Turnbuttons for the floorboards

Turnbuttons for the floorboards

Notice the turnbuttons used the hold the floorboards in place. We like this method because it not only holds the floorboards down, but also keeps them in place. A quick twist of the turnbutton, and the floorboard is easily removed without tools.

Looking into the motorwell

Looking into the motorwell

We mount a sacrificial teak pad on the forward edge of the motor well. It can easily be replaced in the future when required. When we cut the hole for the motor’s lower unit, we saved the cut out piece so it could be used as a plug when the motor is not in place. A stick attached to the plug is wedged under the teak pad to hold it in place. This also means you don’t have to stick your hand in icy water to remove the plug when you are ready to mount the motor.

Plug for the motorwell

Plug for the motorwell

Using the cut-out to create the plug results in nearly seamless surface on the exterior of the hull which reduces drag.

Thwart knee with copper bushing

Thwart knee with copper bushing

Since the jib sheet passes through the thwart knee to a cleat just aft of it, we installed a copper sleeve to reduce chafe on the knee. Carriage bolts fasten the benches to the thwart.

Boom and yard fittings

Boom and yard fittings

Rigging the gunter sloop requires some specialized hardware. Some we buy, some we cast ourselves in our small foundry. This photo shows the boom fitting and the jaws on the yard. We add protective leather where spars would otherwise get chafed.

Caledonia Yawl masthead

Caledonia Yawl masthead

We purchased the boom fitting as well as the mastband illustrated here. The diamond shaped copper pieces are covering the pins of the sheaves. This will allow for maintenance or replacement in the future if the need arises.

The shoulder  which the mastband rests on is reinforced with a few layers of fiberglass tape. This will prevent the mastband from crushing the shoulder when the rig is heavily loaded.

Now that the boat is complete, it’s time for sea trials!

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