Caledonia Yawl – Chapter 10: Paint and Varnish, Part 2

With the exterior painted (except for the sheerstrake), we now move to the interior. Sanding all of the interior surfaces is time consuming, but care and attention results in a superior finish. We prefer a satin finish on the interior, usually a neutral beige or grey with an accent color or varnish on the trim pieces. This boat will have a light grey interior with grey–blue thwarts and benches and a white exterior with a dark blue sheerstrake. These two photos show the interior before the primer and enamel are applied.

Preparing to apply undercoat

Preparing to apply undercoat

Vacuuming before applying undercoat

Vacuuming before applying undercoat

Here Tom is using an HVLP spray set up to apply the undercoat to the interior. We apply two coats and then sand and putty any imperfections.

Spraying the undercoat

Spraying the undercoat

The undercoat sands easily and provides a smooth base for the marine enamel.

Two coats of undercoat have been applied

Two coats of undercoat have been applied

The thwart and the side benches are receiving their first coat of grey blue enamel. The centerboard trunk cap will be the same color.

The first coat of enamel on the thwart and side benches

The first coat of enamel on the thwart and side benches

Meanwhile, progress is occurring on the other painted parts. Here the rudder head is receiving its second coat of enamel. This is the same white as the hull.

The final coat of enamel on the rudder head

The final coat of enamel on the rudder head

We took advantage of a day when it wasn’t actually raining to let the parts air dry. The outdoors has significantly better air flow and the recent rains have kept the dust down. Keeping dust out of the paint and varnish is a challenge in a busy shop. We have several parts in various stages of finishing. The rudder blade is clamped to the CY mold while it receives its final coat of enamel (the top of the blade is masked off because it is coated with graphite infused epoxy for wear resistance). The 10 foot oars in the background are receiving their fourth coat of varnish. We apply at least six coats of varnish to the clear finished parts. We’ve been having a small issue with suicidal bugs the last few days. What on earth attracts them to varnish? White paint is equally appealing, it seems.

Normally we disassemble the mold immediately after the boat is removed from the it to clear space in the shop. In this case we left the mold assembled, in case our next commission was for another CY. As it turns out, it looks like the next two boats built will both be Caledonia Yawls.

Painting and varnishing various bits and pieces

Painting and varnishing various bits and pieces

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