Tirrik is complete!

We completed the Tirrik in time for the 2011 Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival in Port Townsend, Washington in early September. The weather was perfect for the festival, so the Tirrik gleamed in the sunlight.

Tirrik at the 2011 Wooden Boat Festival in Port Townsend, WA

Tirrik at the 2011 Wooden Boat Festival in Port Townsend, WA

We love participating in the shows because it gives us the opportunity to talk to other interested in wooden boats and to answer questions about the boats we build.

The completed Tirrik interior

The completed Tirrik interior

Here Tom is explaining the benefits of the mizzen in a lug yawl rig. The mizzen sheet runs through a block on the rudder head and leads forward for easy access for the helmsman.

Tom discussing the benefits of the mizzen

Tom discussing the benefits of the mizzen

You can also see the beaching rudder in the same photo. It has internal control lines that raise and lower the rudder blade. Whichever is in use is tied to a cleat on the mizzen partner.

The rudder control lines

The rudder control lines

This boat is rigged with a Norwegian style tiller. This is attached to a tiller arm that is held in the rudder head with a wedge attached to a piece of leather.

The mizzen rigging

The mizzen rigging

The owner of this boat chose to have an open boat with no bulkheads or decks. There are two rowing stations and three thwarts. There are side benches which help the skipper adjust crew weight for the appropriate sailing conditions.

Interior of the Tirrik (CY ladder frame in the background)

Interior of the Tirrik (Caledonia Yawl ladder frame in the background)

We leather the spars where they cross each other to protect them from damage. We fabricate a teak block that holds the main mast in place while in use. A bungee cord applies tension and holds it in place. When it is removed, the mast can easily be lowered for transport or storage. We make our own teak cleats. Two are installed on the forward and aft inner stems to use to attached mooring lines, and others are used to cleat off halyards and the rudder control lines.

Finally the day comes when we can launch her and go for a sail with the new owner.

Getting underway in the Tirrik...

Getting underway in the Tirrik...

...and returning after a successful first sail

...and returning after a successful first sail

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